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want to make prior to making any real conclusions, probably is there a connection to pakistan unofficial or otherwise. is this the first attack that we're going to see and the only attack we're going to see? are there going to be more attacks in mumbai or other placesment third and probably most important, how does this affect pakistani-indian relations. that has been a border and boiling point for decades, the indiana yeah and pakistani relations. we are talking to the pakistanis saying, your biggest problem is not india, it's in pakistan and the taliban and terrorist attacks about you. the pakistanis always say, no, no it's india. who you worry about, jon, whoever's fault this is, this will increase tension between india and pakistan and those are two countries who have nuclear weapons. jon: we are looking from the state ride indian television. they are reporting eight people killed. that's what our viewers are seeing on the screen. this comes on the heels of the assassination of president karzai's brother in afghanistan. any likely correction there? >> reporter: not clear.
laden's compound in pakistan and terror group is now within reach. david is live from kabul, afghanistan. >> reporter: the duly appointed defense secretary arrived here a few hours ago to find out for himself the situation on the ground here. he has brief talks with military officials including david petraeus and then he went straight into a meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai. their discussions included the transition of nato held areas of afghan control starting in july but also the drawdown of u.s. troops over the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's
it to pakistan? a secret letter that might hold some clues is in the hands of a washington reporter. >>> a court hearing this howard for jared loughner. his doctors say he's dangerous even behind bars. >>> in bring, the popular "news of the world" is done after this sunday, but the investigation is not over, and journalists aren't the only target of investigators. you're in "the situation room." >>> a lot of hard bargaining ahead as the president and congressional leaders try to hammer out a deal on raising the federal debt limit as the august 2nd deadline looms, most parties are firming up their bottom lines. joining me now is senator tom coburn from oklahoma. senator, i know that you have today pentagon with speaker boehner about the republican position, or at least his position going into these debt talks. what can you tell me about where you are now when it comes to the revenue side of this equation? >> well, i think speaker boehner related that everything is on the table. i think it should be. i think that's the only way we solve this problem for our country, so i think it will be a compone
to the boarder with pakistan. >>> capture or kill. that reportedly is the question the obama administration is internally debating when it comes to what to do about wanted terrorists. we all know capturing suspects in the mountains of pakistan or in yemen is not easy and if the recent uptick in predator drone strikes is any indication it appears the white house has its preference. catherine herridge is live in washington with more. >> with no new detainees at guantanamo bay since march of 2008, they said picking al-qaeda operate evanss up alive is a dangerous task and sent offases they are shent shore until a decision can be made. >> what is the longest we can keep an individual on the ship. >> depends whether we can prosecute them or return them to a third-party country. >> what if you can't do any of those? >> we will release that individual. >> with no consistent policy on detention and prosecution, congressional and intelligence sources tell fox they fear the preemptive option has become the kill option. multiple al-qaeda operatives been killed by cia operations including an alleged pla
pakistan a strong message >> the pakistani relationship is difficult but it must be made to work overtime. but until we get through these difficulties, we will hold back some of the many that the american taxpayers have committed to give. >> some $800 million? >> yep. >> it's a lot of cash but is it a political move. our next guest called out the pakistani government in 2006 claiming they knew osama bin laden in's location. peter thompson joins me. he's the author of the new book "the wars of afghanistan." good to see you. >> thank you. >> i want to get your thoughts we reported that the half-brother of huh mean karzai in afghanistan has been assassinated. how does that affect the relationships? >> he was assassinated by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization
in pakistan. >> dave: they believe the head of al-qaeda is in pakistan al sar zawahiri. they said they're not happy with their actions and-- >> they're ratting us out when we go to the leaders. >> dave: they've kicked out military trainers. >> mike: it's hard to give money to people, maybe a segment of the pakistan military was harboring osama bin laden for goodness sake. >> ainsley: time for the headlines. two tennessee national guard members are dead after their helicopter goes down. the chopper crashed during a routine training flight. the chopper hit power lines on the way down, knocking out power to thousands of residents there as well. no word yet on the cause. the pilots were in an oh-58-d kiowa helicopter the subject of a lawsuit allegedly, alleging a faulty control system and fighter jets intercept two civilian planes near camp david where president obama is staying. it happened at separate times. both planes were escorted to nearby airports and they say the first plane had been out of radio communication. no word why the cessna got so close. the third time this month that pla
. that always raises the spector of the isi in pakistan. >> still photos seem to confirm early reports that the plot relied on improvised explosive devices or ied's plabilitied in parked cars. an attack often associated with afghanistan, iraq and pakistan. but, again tonight there is still no immediate claim of responsibility. that's the same pattern we saw back in 2008, trace. >> trace: catherine, this could effect the united states as well, right? >> as soon as the story broke, the focus was on these similarities with the attack in 2008. that was a rampage that was surprisingly low tech. it relied on 10 pakistani militants armed with cell phones, handguns and backpacks filled with explosives. the group with links to pakistani intelligence was ultimately blamed. leading analysts warn to jumping to any conclusions. >> if the attack were caused to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major complications for the united states. we don't want to see those two countries go into another crisis and fight another war which they have done three times in the past. >
pakistan anyway, isn't it? >>guest: well, the reason we got into this mess is because of pakistan in the 1980's and we pumped $6 million into the system creating the monsters we are fighting now. keep in mind if you step back and look at global stage the world is better but it is a direct threat against american interests overseas from islamic fundamentalist groups that use violence instead of political means. >>shepard: robert, good to hear from you. the united nations has reported 1,462 civilian deaths in six months of this year in afghanistan a 15 percent increase from the first half of 2010. in parts of the midwest in the central united states, another day of triple digit temperatures. the heat wave is a monster. i know, it's july. it's hot, but this can kill people. 17 states are now under heat warnings and we will show you warnings and we will show you all of them. new citracal slow release... continuously releases calcium plus d for the efficient absorption my body needs. citracal. carol. fiber makes me sad. oh common. and how can you talk to me about fiber while you are ea
their ability . also he believes that al-zawahri may be over the border in pakistan's northwestern federally administered tribal area. the defense secretary will have to deal with tense relations with pakistan following the killing of osama bin laden there. he said there was efforts to help them in the hunt for al-qaida members. but he said they have helped in the past track some of them down. back to you. >> david, in kabul. >> political sacrifices are needed on both sides of the aisle to solve the budget critesis. will democrats and republicans move past the rhetoric when they sit down in the white house tomorrow. >> hi, to you john. goal to whack four trillion off of the deficit over 10 years. president obama emphasized the positive. >>ed -- the good news is, we agree on the big thingings. after racking up deficit debts we need to get our fiscal house in order. both sides are going to have to step outside of the comfort zones and make political sacrifices. >> it sounds good but easier said than done. players mest thursday . they will vote on increasing the debt ceiling. if they don't rais
and pakistan over the past year, counterterrorism efforts in yemen must be a central focus of our national security strategy. that said, our -- closely in line with political, economic and developmental challenges as well. those challenges are those that the united states must work to address as part of a holistic approach to this challenge. first of all, just outlined three. three priorities. first, we need a better understanding of the political opposition and prospects for democratic reform. acting president, the vice president in yemen, as only a small power base in the opposition appears fractured between the so-called joint meeting parties, jmp. and other individuals such as the former commander of the first armored division and check out omar, leader of the powerful fellow. over the weekend elements of the opposition asked the formation of a shadow government to the composition and support, i should say though the -- for those the composition and support for the group remains unclear. it is clear however that the transition process will take place sooner or later. the president has
-qaida network was angry and frustrated by the cia campaign in the tribal areas of pakistan and achieving the objective to take senior operatives off of the battlefield and keep the group under pressure so it is difficult for operatives to plan, train and raise money. uma, it is no coincidence that we are starting an identical campaign in yemen. yemen is one of the rising threatt hubs and americans are front and center in al-awaki who i describe is leader of al-qaida 2.0. he was overlooked in a key player in the al-qaida network. why was he not taken seriously? >> one of the things i lay out in the book behind the scene was our . what i showed in interviews and phone records. al-awlaki's contact with the hijackers were evidence of a personful relationship. when he return to the pentagon in 2002 as part of the outreach to moderate muslims, it was like a thief returnns to the scene of the crime, he was contacted with three of the five hijackers on flight 577 that went in the building. >>> and one of the things that is interesting, you want people to understand that this is not simply a ques
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
was the worst since the siege on the hub in 2008. officials blame pakistan-based militants but, so far, no group has claimed responsibility for yesterday's bloody strike and members of an islamic militant organization have been questioned. in another deadly attack in afghanistan, coming in the middle of a memorial service for the president's half brother who was assassinated this week. we're told a suicide bomber hit explosives in histor -- if his turban. the service was for karzai's brother who assassination leaves a major power vacuum in kandahar as civilian deaths in afghanistan jumped 15 percent so far this year. two men raped his daughter and wife and murdered his entire family and set the house ablaze and now attorneys for a suspect charged in the case say that they do not want the doctor in the courtroom for the trail because he is not a victim. our legal panel is back now with a look at both sides of the argument in a moment. es that in. new citracal slow release... continuously releases calcium plus d for the efficient absorption my body needs. citracal. you know that comes with a priva
the border in pakistan is a concern back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent strong hold. high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic from the taliban i know. they're getting gutsy. right past there. if you go past that you're going to take enemy contact, it's pretty certain. >> the afghans are clear about who lay in weight for them ahead. >> translator: it's very dangerous, there are taliban, arabs, pakistanis there. >> at the foot of the valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, sometimes from lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for invading. nick payton walsh, cnn afghanistan. here at quicken loans, we like to go the extra mile for our clients. with the wassman family, it was 2,500 extra miles. we're the wassman family from skagway, alaska. livin' so far out and not
near the mountainous border of pakistan. helicopters carrying dozens of elite army rangers race over the rugged landscape. their target is an insurgent compound. the mission is high-risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed. but it is considered a risk worth taking because if intelligence indicates that a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. soon the helicopters touch down and our rangers immediately come under fire. within minutes leroy, then a staff sergeant, and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls. that's when the enemy opens up with the ak-47s. leroy is hit in both legs. he is bleeding badly. but he summons the strength to lead the other ranger to cover behind a chicken coop. he radios for support. he hurls a grenade at the enemy giving cover to a third ranger who rushes to their aid. an enemy grenade explodes nearby wounding leroy's two comrades. then, a second grenade lands, this time only a few feet away. every human impulse would tell someone to turn away. every soldier is trained to seek cover. that is wha
they be in yemen, somalia, pakistan or north and central africa. but on this trip in afghanistan panetta is expected to meet with his counterpart, the defense ministry in afghanistan, and he is also expected to have a press conference with the afghan president, hamid karzai. aside from that, the most important part of the visit is talking to the u.s. commanders on the ground here in afghanistan, talking to the u.s. servicemen and women as well who are fighting the fight within the country. right now the strategic time within the war and afghanistan, the president announced the withdrawal plan by the end of this year. 10,000 americans are supposed to leave the country by the end of next year. he's hoping another $23,000 by next year. right now the time for secretary panetta to talk to the commanders here, to the afghan government here, to see how to transition the authority they have in afghanistan back to the afghan people. >> do you think the key to targeting al qaeda is all the information taken from osama bin ladin's compound on may 2nd? >> reporter: well, that's the big question. did
will shift to more intel and special forces work and will center on the eastern border of pakistan. >>> the sweet and balmer children in maryland, what a wonderful day. it's wedding day and brings together two families torn apart by war. bob barnard was at the ceremony. >> reporter: beneath the towering air force memorial overlooking the nation's capitol, amid the bus loads of tourists on this hazy summer day appears a white stretched limo, and in it, two families scarred by war. >> he always tells me i'm his fourth of july so he picked the fourth and the location. >> reporter: it's the wedding of air force master sergeant chris sweet and his bride, danielle. in attendance, her two and his three children. >> this is not just about danielle and i coming together. it's about two families coming together, two families that have been through amazing tragedy. >> reporter: in danielle's bouquet of flowers, the two spouses they lost to war. >> this is another way to have them. >> reporter: air force technical sergeant ryan balmer was killed in iraq four years ago. he was 33. >> it was dif
. four suspected u.s. drone strikes in northwestern pakistan killed at least 42 alleged militants in less than 12 hours. the attacks come at a time when relations between the united states and pakistan are especially strained. if you haven't noticed. the white house just cut $800 million in aid to pakistan's military. >> special wake-up for the crews of the shuttle at the international space station. >> ♪ rocket man i'm burning out of ♪ >> good morning, atlantis! this is elton john. we wish you much success on your mission and a huge thank you to all the men and women at nasa who worked on the shuttle for the last three decades. >> good morning, houston. elton john. he's a legend. wow. that is absolutely fantastic. >> "rocket man" is a popular wake-up song for nasa used three times before. they are taking supplies to the space station. >> i wonder if roger clemens will use that in his trial today. friends and relatives of a murder victim attacking a suspect in the courthouse hallway. things got so out of control, as you see, officers had to use tasers. the video was released after
of strategically feeting al qaeda. he says the u.s. identified 10 to 20 leaders who he says are in pakistan, yemen and in other areas. >>> and one new nation in the world, two big celebrations marking independence day. this is the flag of the now independent nation of south sudan, rising for the first time over the capital city of juba. the country is officially separate today after five decades of on and off civil war with the mostly muslim north. the same flag rising today in washington, d.c. over the new embassy of south sudan. >>> so let's talk about that moment some more, that scene of the flag rising above the new embassy of south sudan in washington. elise abbott is the senior state department producer. that scene almost as important as the celebration in south sudan. lots of symbolism that comes here and a real commitment too between the u.s. and south sudan. >> that's right. the u.s. really for decades has been working to help south sudan for this moment. the u.s. really under the bush administration started pushing this agreement, this comprehensive peace agreement between south and nort
. >> the job is most certainly not done. al qaeda operatives still plan across the border in pakistan. the taliban still try to regain lost ground. still intimidate and still assassinate. >> these attacks on karzai's inner circle are, we're told, likely to get worse as u.s. troops again coming home and through the transition in 2014, shepard. >> shepard: jennifer, thank you. there is word of enough signs two al qaeda groups may be joining forces. u.s. officials are now saying the branch in yemen has given weapons, fighters, beings explosives and training to the affiliate in somalia. yes, ma'am mental and somalia coming together against us. the officials say this is especially dangerous because both groups have recruited u.s. citizens. remember that radical american cleric anwar al awlaki is the leader of al qaeda in yemen. the feds have linked him to recent terror plots against the united states. including the attempted christmas day underwear bombing, the food massacre and botched times square bombing. catherine herridge works intelligence for us live from d.c. tonight. catherine, de
in pakistan, i'm getting letters, they love me. they don't care about the deseptembercons. >> by the way he is a good guy. >> bill: is he a little crazy. he is a little crazy. i had to -- you know. we didn't know he was a good guy until later on when the decremplet -- decepticons. >> you removed the reason for me to go see it. >> bill: chicago they blow it up street by street when they come to reverend wright it's just gruesome. [ laughter ] >> bill: that didn't happen but -- >> one of the members of the factor said this is citizen cain if you like robots fighting in 3-d in a half hour. >> bill: fighting a lot. there is a lot of fighting. i'm one of the calmer influences. dagen mcdowell, everybody. >> you rock. >> bill: in a moment pinheads and patriots critters killing americans. what's the most dangerous animal insect to reptile in the u.s.a. we will tell you p and p after these messages. wo [crowd cheers] ♪ strike three out two down out there two down [crowd cheers] ♪ ♪ [crowd cheers] [male announcer] sometimes, coming home can be a battle in itself. our wounded warriors need every
went into the pakistan border with u.s. troops and here is what they found. >> reporter: in eastern afghanistan, it looks like this. americans pushing the afghans to the front, taking the high ground and impossible to police. the pressure for less americans here is extreme. but the afghans only mustered five men for this patrol. >> when you shoot it has to be five to seven-round bursts and let it go. >> reporter: despite this training, policing the local villages. let alone, taking on the terrorists network america came here to eradicate. here that afghanistan's future looks a lot like its past. american control does not extend up in this valley and high on the ridge lines they found safe havens for lked lk. u.s. and afghanistan officials are revealed to cnn they located here al qaeda fighters using the s secluded villages. air-lifted in americans were forced in and they faced a nastier fight than planned. u.s. officials say they killed 120 insurgents and top leaders, many taliban, but several of them arabs linked to al qaeda, damaging their network. yet, the clashes reveal that al
. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport security but the overall system, of course, is only as good as the weakest link, gregg. gregg: the senator said this issue is more now. what has changed in that regard? >> >> reporter: let's take the example of the underwear bomber, it's a good example of a foreign national, in this case a nigerian, who came through yemen and on to amsterdam before he boarded a flight on christmas day in 2009, the american cleric, anwar al-awlaki, the first american on the kill or capture list was the first man there, abdulmutallab, and the bomb maker. >> the threat is far more diverge than it was -- diverse than it was a decade ago. now
hurling a bottle of water. it happened during rocket attacks in neighboring pakistan. a passionate topic. >>> now back to casey anthony and the question now, is this her final day behind bars after being acquitted for murder. the 25-year-old has a sentence hearing for just misdemeanor convictions. david manningly is outside the courthouse in orlando, florida. you have been watching this closely. what is the expectation about whether or not she's getting free tomorrow? >> reporter: well, those four counts of lying to officers, they each carry one year maximum in jail. she's been in jail almost three years. it's possible the judge could say time served and let her go free tomorrow. if that's the case, that's just one scenario. if that's the case, the orange county correction department says she won't be released like a typical inmate is once they are let go at the courthouse because of the emotional intense scrutiny on the kate. they put out the statement saying appropriate measures will be taken to release the acquitted into such a manner so as to preserve the safety of the acquitted indi
to al qaeda, damaging their network. they're said to be mostly across the border, and pakistan is again a concern back where they started. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent stronghold, high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them. >> it's uncharacteristic for the taliban. they're getting gutsy. right past there are usually patrols. if you push it far past that, you're going to take enemy contact it's pretty certain. >> the afghans clear about who lay in wait for them ahead. [ speaking foreign language ] >> reporter: at the foot of the valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, times from lone gunmen up high, who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making it harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network made america's case for invading, slipping back in just when america makes its case to leave. nick paton walsh. >>> we're going to find out what's next for anthony after she was sentenced this morning for lying to police. well-being. we're all striving for it
revealed while holed up in pakistan, bin laden encouraged direct plots to attack americans and u.s. interests it in europe late last year. bin laden was killed in a u.s. raid at his pakistani compound back in may. >>> looks like a scene out of a horror movie, but this is just one example of today's desperate times. these folks are running because they need help paying for a place to live. we will explain next. [ barks ] ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ whistles ] ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ ting! ] [ male announcer ] travelers can help you protect the things you care about and save money with multi-policy discounts. are you getting the coverage you need and the discounts you deserve? for an agent or quote, call 800-my-coverage or visit travelers.com. personal pricing now on brakes. tell us what you want to pay. we do our best to make that work. deal! my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> for the first time until five years, dallas county handed out section 8 rental vouchers to help those with low to no income get housing, and this was the scene. take a look at this. crowds estimated at about 5
it in north africa, in pakistan. in the very unstable areas of the world if they can go and thraeupb and come together. the question is can they bring the operatives to this country or work with people already in the country, what we call the inspired but not instructed, the home-grown guys. jon: i would think with all the satish kalpoe lights that we have, things that we weren't watching in afghanistan in the days up to 9/11 i think we'd be looking out for that stuff. >> we absolutely are. they get better too. th have a complex financial system. they funnel money back and forth. they are looking to exploit different opportunities. la fall when they tried to put the packages on the planes to take out cargo, they are constantly evolving and it's always a cllenge for people like ray kelly in new york city to have that readiness always available. jon: as has been said so many times the terrorists only have to get lucky once, we have to be right one hundred percent of the time. >> ten years later there is mission fatigue. it's expected, it's natural. the question is how do you reinvigorate the wh
into the gulf of oman, towards pakistan. it is very important. these two monarchies have done everything possible to crush any sign or effort of reform or agitation for reform. in the case of the saudi arabia, there were quite successful in doing this. some of the liberal saudis tried to have a so-called day of raids on march 11. -- a so-called day of rage on march 11. exactly one person showed up in riyadh. that person was swamped by journalists. but 17,000 people had signed up on the facebook page to come out and participate in the day of rage. some shiites in the eastern province show that the day before and had their demonstration. but, basically, the saudis have been able to mobilize not only the threat of security forces cracking down on anybody who demonstrates, the got the religious establishment making any kind of demonstrations religiously forbidden. they put pressure on families to keep their kids at home. and they succeeded. in the case of bahrain, it was much more messy, and you have a shiite majority there of 70% may become a 65% to 75%. and they were on their way to probab
-qaida operatives still plot and plan across the border in pakistan. the taliban still try to regain lost ground, still intimidate and still assassinate as we just saw this past week about the brutal killing of president karzai's brother. hamid karzai trying to climb into his brother's grave last week is facing almost daily challenges to his rule. his brother was assassinated by a trusted bodyguard. a former governor and loyal political adviser to karzai was assassinate ned his apartment by two taliban gunman wearing bomb belts. >> in crushing heat and in numbing cold from the deserts of southern afghanistan to the peaks of the behind due kush. you have shown initiative, determination, innovative necessary and courage. you have been diplomats as well as warriors, statesman as well as soldiers. your performance as been in a word awesome. >> reporter: general petraeus handed over his command to marine general john allen. petraeus will retire from the army and particular over as the head of the cia in september. >> there will be tough days ahead. and i have no illusions about the challenges we will
. what was his connection to pakistan? there are so many unanswered questions about his overseas connections and what he was really doing and his radicalization during the process in which the military did nothing. and finally, the information the joint terrorism task force had about mr. al laak can i and communications with major hasan at fort hood. why wasn't it shared with general cohen at fort hood when it could have stopped the murder of 13 soldiers? jon: a lot of questions there. let's hope you get answers. congressman, thank you. >> i appreciate it. alisyn: here's what is happening now. joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen giving a briefing on the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the defense department budget as the military faces questions about the mounting cost of american involvement in the libyan conflict as well. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live from the pentagon for us. jennifer, what did we learn from this briefing? >> reporter: alisyn, he didn't really speak about the libyan conflict for or the cost of it. discussion was with the pentagon
and operations really pick up in places like yemen and somalia. of course, top concerns always pakistan and what's going on inside that country and north korea and perhaps the number one target, if you will, for gathering intelligence about what they are up to may well be iran. the u.s. believes iran is really trying to extend its influence in both afghanistan and iraq and around the world. there will be a lot of effort over the coming years to see what iran is up to. general petraeus in charge of all of that now as director petraeus. we will see if he gives up the nickname he had for so many years since he attended west point where his cadet, fellow cadet buddies, used to call him peaches petraeus. >> where's the peaches come from? >> you know, guys at the academy, they just sort of make stuff up. i found out recently that amongst his buddies, his fellow former cadets, many of them now two, three, four-star generals themselves, that name peaches petraeus has stuck over the years. close friends, amongst others, maybe behind his back. not too much to his face. he's often called king david petraeu
the border with pakistan. this is an area they could turn over. they are doing it and it's a test case. canadians ceased their combat operations last week. they are going to replace their combat troops with 950 trainers. everybody is looking at the exit since the united states announceded we're pulling out. >> jamie: 10,000 of our troops will leave at the end of this year. and that has begun. how is it going? >> it's too early to tell. what happened is 650 troops left. they will not be replaced. that is the first increment of the 10,000 that you mentioned. so it will be, hopefully it will be more of a gradual reduction, so that we can meter the troops out as we take account of what is really happening on the ground. >> jamie: several generals recommended a slower withdrawal schedule than what president obama wants and is currently going to get. do you think we'll hear from them again? or in the military way will they just do what they have been asked to do? >> the thing about the military professionals, you have two options. you can execute the orders as best you can or resign. you don
border with pakistan. the comments come weeks after president obama announced plans to withdraw more than 30,000 troops by the end of next year. an explosive show over the national mall, revelers got to enjoy this display in what better place, the nation's capital. the celebrations weren't just here in america. over in afghanistan, the marines chowed down on some delicious barbecue. that is it look good. >> almost like famous dave's. almost, yeah. almost. >> like famous dave petraeus. >> famous dave petraeus who is counting down the days. especially july 4th. senator mccain and senator graham. >> i think general petraeus is really going to miss the troops. spending his whole career, going to the c.i.a. is a great move for him. i know he'll miss those troops very much. >> i'm happy for his family because he'll get to be stateside for most of the time oochl ahe'll have to run some errands. >> yeah, i think so. >> that honey do list got a little closer. >> exactly. >> meanwhile, speaking of senators, the senators will be working today. house returns tomorrow. they had planned to recess but b
adversaries in their country. they face external adversaries to the east with pakistan, to the west with iran and you can't simply just pull the rug out from under them like we did with vietnam in 1975. and i think what americans are looking at is we do not want to squander the blood and treasure that's been put into this. i did an interview with one young marine who has been decorated for his heroism, asked him the question as to what he -- i think you've got that up there. >> we do. take a listen. >> the president has said it's time to start phasing marines out of here. do you have an opinion about that? >> no, sir, i'm united states marine and i go where my commander in chief sends me. >> that's totally off the cuff from a young guy who has been in combat out there since january and that kind of reflects the attitude of all the soldiers, sailors and the marines that i've covered out there now for 10 years of this war. they're ready to go wherever their commander in chief sends them. they will privately tell you, we don't want to leave until this job is finished. and quite frankly, it's n
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